Iowa Cattleman April 2016 : Page 34

VET’S VIEW Grant Dewell, DVM Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine Iowa State University Simmentals at Tama Lot 288 March son of MCM Top Grade 018Z BW: 91 • ADG: 4.18 • WDA: 3.11 CE 8.3 BW .9 WW 63.6 YW 97.7 Lot 289 March son of Schlesselman Bull 178Z BW: 87 • ADG: 4.30 • WDA: 3.16 CE 9 BW -2.1 WW 47.7 YW 65.6 How will the Veterinary Feed Directive affect Beef Cattle Production? New antibiotic regulations explained Heifer Lots 432-434 Sired by HS/DSS Avenger A37P Avg. BW 85 • Avg ADG 2.92 Avg. WDA 2.98 • Avg Int. Wt. 957 I Brian Schlesselman 2131 240th St | Williamsburg, IA 52361 Ph. 319.430.0841 n the January article we covered some the background that led to the current Veterninary Feed Directive (VFD) (antibiotic regulations) situation. This arti-cle will cover the impact that the changes in FDA policy will have on your beef cattle operation. The first principal that the FDA is implementing is to remove growth promo-tion claims from antibiotics that are consid-ered important for human medicine. In reality, this principal will have limited impact on beef cattle production. Very few of the feed grade antibiotics (considered medically important) used in beef produc-tion are used to enhance growth. The ionophores (Rumensin and Bovatec) are not medically important so we are not losing the ability to use these for increased feed effi-ciency. The second principal that the FDA is implementing, the veterinary oversight requirement, will have some impact on beef production. As of January 1, 2017 all of the medically important feed medications, such as tetracycline and tylosin, will no longer be available as over-the-counter (OTC) med-ications. Therefore, in order to use medicat-ed feed with medically important antibiotics in it you will need a Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD) to purchase the feed. Prior to January 1, 2017 you should have a dis-cussion with your veterinarian and feed sup-plier to make sure that everything is properly in place so that there are not any disruptions in your ability to properly care for your cattle. Although the VFD process has been around 20 years, veterinarians and feed dis-tributors have not used them in the quanti-ty that we will at the beginning of the New Year. april 2016 There may be some delays and growing pains the first few months, so it will be bet-ter if you can get as much as possible in place beforehand. The specific feed medication you need and what you will be using it for will determine how the VFD may be writ-ten to best suit your needs. For example, a feedlot that is planning on continuously feeding Tylan to prevent liver abscesses will be different than a cow-calf operation that needs to feed CTC in the fly season to con-trol Anaplasmosis. Where you are able to buy some med-icated feeds may change also. A feed retail-er can only sell VFD feeds if they have filled out the proper paperwork with the FDA. Some smaller local feed distributers/retail-ers or chain stores may not want to go through the process and invite increased FDA oversight into their business. The availability to buy medicated feeds such as medicated milk replacer, complete feeds used for 4H projects, etc. may be reduced in some areas. I encourage you attend a VFD meeting sometime in the next 6 months to make sure you have a firm understanding of all the ramifications. Many pharmaceutical and feed companies are sponsoring VFD meet-ings. Additionally, look for informational meetings offered by ISU Extension, Iowa Farm Bureau, and Iowa Cattleman’s Association. Additionally, keep track of your feed medication usage this year so that you know in advance when you will need a VFD in place next year to minimize any problems that may arise. The next article in this series will address how the VFD process works. 34

Vet’s View

Grant Dewell

How will the Veterinary Feed Directive affect Beef Cattle Production?

New antibiotic regulations explained

In the January article we covered some the background that led to the current Veterninary Feed Directive (VFD) (antibiotic regulations) situation. This article will cover the impact that the changes in FDA policy will have on your beef cattle operation.

The first principal that the FDA is implementing is to remove growth promotion claims from antibiotics that are considered important for human medicine. In reality, this principal will have limited impact on beef cattle production. Very few of the feed grade antibiotics (considered medically important) used in beef production are used to enhance growth. The ionophores (Rumensin and Bovatec) are not medically important so we are not losing the ability to use these for increased feed efficiency.

The second principal that the FDA is implementing, the veterinary oversight requirement, will have some impact on beef production. As of January 1, 2017 all of the medically important feed medications, such as tetracycline and tylosin, will no longer be available as over-the-counter (OTC) medications. Therefore, in order to use medicated feed with medically important antibiotics in it you will need a Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD) to purchase the feed. Prior to January 1, 2017 you should have a discussion with your veterinarian and feed supplier to make sure that everything is properly in place so that there are not any disruptions in your ability to properly care for your cattle.

Although the VFD process has been around 20 years, veterinarians and feed distributors have not used them in the quantity that we will at the beginning of the New Year.

There may be some delays and growing pains the first few months, so it will be better if you can get as much as possible in place beforehand. The specific feed medication you need and what you will be using it for will determine how the VFD may be written to best suit your needs. For example, a feedlot that is planning on continuously feeding Tylan to prevent liver abscesses will be different than a cow-calf operation that needs to feed CTC in the fly season to control Anaplasmosis.

Where you are able to buy some medicated feeds may change also. A feed retailer can only sell VFD feeds if they have filled out the proper paperwork with the FDA. Some smaller local feed distributers/retailers or chain stores may not want to go through the process and invite increased FDA oversight into their business. The availability to buy medicated feeds such as medicated milk replacer, complete feeds used for 4H projects, etc. may be reduced in some areas.

I encourage you attend a VFD meeting sometime in the next 6 months to make sure you have a firm understanding of all the ramifications. Many pharmaceutical and feed companies are sponsoring VFD meetings. Additionally, look for informational meetings offered by ISU Extension, Iowa Farm Bureau, and Iowa Cattleman’s Association. Additionally, keep track of your feed medication usage this year so that you know in advance when you will need a VFD in place next year to minimize any problems that may arise. The next article in this series will address how the VFD process works.

Read the full article at http://digitalmag.iacattlemen.org/article/Vet%E2%80%99s+View/2445868/296309/article.html.

Brian Schlesselman

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