Iowa Cattleman October 2016 : Page 15

VET’S VIEW Grant Dewell, DVM Veterinary Diagnostic and Production Animal Medicine, Iowa State University Veterinary Feed Directive Countdown, Part 4 he last article in this series will focus on some of the specific information needed in a valid Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD). Although it is up to the vet-erinarian to write the VFD, there is some information that they will need from you so that you can easily implement usage of the product. If the VFD is not filled out correct-ly, the feed distributer is obligated to reject the VFD. However, the VFD could be filled out correctly for the drug itself that makes it a valid VFD but specifics about your manage-ment could make implementation of the VFD difficult. The basic information needed is the name and address of the veterinarian and the client. The feed distributer does not have to be list-ed on the VFD and you can take it to the dis-tributer of your choice. However, if the veterinarian is going to send it electronically for you they will need to know who the dis-tributer is. If you are using a paper copy to get the order filled, you can only have it filled at one feed distributer. The next section of the VFD specifies the drug, drug level, duration of use, species and class of animal and indication of usage. This information is all specified on the drug label and any deviation from the label is consider extra label usage which is illegal for feed med-ications. There will also be a statement that reorders or refills are not allowed. VFDs are for one-time usage and cannot be refilled. If another treatment is necessary, your veteri-narian will need to write a 2nd VFD. A com-mon example would be pulsing CTC for 5 days for respiratory disease. Once you pulse a set of cattle for 5 days you cannot repulse without a new VFD. Your original VFD may still be valid to treat other groups of cattle but not the one that has already been treated. One change in the VFD process that the FDA has made is that the VFD is not written for tons of feed anymore. Instead your veteri-narian will write it for the approximate num-ber of animals and the feed distributer will then determine amount of feed medication T you can purchase. This is one area where your veterinarian needs information from you. The number of animals is the total number of ani-mals that the VFD will affect. So a feedlot that is wanting to feed tylan to prevent liver abscesses would need the VFD to reflect the number of animals on feed at the time it is written PLUS the number of cattle you plan on buying over the next 6 months. The next piece of information is the premises where the animals are located. This is not your premises ID but the physical address (911 address) where the animals are located. If you don’t have a 911 address (pas-ture) then your veterinarian will need the GPS coordinates. We can list multiple premises on one VFD so it is important you let your veterinarian know where all of those locations are. The VFD also specifies what other feed medications the drug can be combined with. Your veterinarian has some flexibility to write the VFD so that only the single antibiotic can be fed or it can be written to allow feeding with other approved combinations. Make sure you tell your veterinarian what other feed medications (ionophores, anti-coccidials, MGA, or beta-agonist products) you may use so that you can get the proper feed or supple-ments for your operation. Lastly, the veterinarian will specify any withdrawal time and the date that the VFD expires. Some VFD drugs have pre-deter-mined expiration dates (45 days for Pulmotil), while most drugs that are moving to VFD sta-tus do not have expiration dates. In that case the longest your veterinarian can write the VFD for is 6 months from the date it is issued. For livestock producers after you receive your VFD you need to keep that copy for at least 2 years and provide to the FDA if they request it. If you lose your copy you can have your veterinarian make you a new copy. Additionally, you will need to keep records of your VFD feed usage. At the minimum you should track inventory in, the date, amount and number of cattle fed the product, and any inventory left over when the VFD expires. If you make a mistake (break a bag, or feed the product to the wrong group of cattle) make sure you document it so inventory quantities match up when the FDA inspectors show up. Remember this rule goes into effect on January 1, 2017 and you will need to have a VFD in place at that time to legally feed a VFD product. Even if you already purchased the feed you still need the VFD to feed it. Stockpiling product will not help as the FDA is already looking for people making large purchases as a way to get around the new rule. Talk with your veterinarian now to make sure you are ready on January 1. Huber Slats 1497 -170th St. • Wellman, IA 52356 Bill Huber • Ph. 319-646-2907 Fenceline bunks Key Benefits •  Acts as both a feeder & a fence for human protection •  Rounded interiors reduce feed waste •  Camphor edges reduce neck abrasions •  Bunks align to form any length • Bunks are poured with 7,500 psi concrete • Reinforced with solid rebar frame welded in place • Optional concrete ends with drain holes available •  Features recessed post to prevent cattle from rubbing on post or cable • Cable shim reduces wear & lengthens the life of cable •  Concrete step poured in the end of each bunk pro-vides support for adjacent bunk • Optional end steps are also available Yard bunks Key Benefits • Allows livestock to feed from both sides and ends. •  Rounded interiors reduce feed waste and prevent damage from freezing. • Rounded camphor edges reduce neck abrasions. • Solid concrete ends feature drain holes. Drain holes may be plugged for use as a waterer. • Concrete footing poured on the end of each bunk keeps feed at the appropriate height. •  Bunks are poured with 7,500 psi concrete using 3/8-inch aggregate reinforced with solid 1/2" rebar on 6"x 6" wire mesh squares. www.iacattlemen.org 15

Vet’s View

Grant Dewell, DVM

Veterinary Feed Directive Countdown, Part 4

The last article in this series will focus on some of the specific information needed in a valid Veterinary Feed Directive (VFD). Although it is up to the veterinarian to write the VFD, there is some information that they will need from you so that you can easily implement usage of the product. If the VFD is not filled out correctly, the feed distributer is obligated to reject the VFD. However, the VFD could be filled out correctly for the drug itself that makes it a valid VFD but specifics about your management could make implementation of the VFD difficult.

The basic information needed is the name and address of the veterinarian and the client. The feed distributer does not have to be listed on the VFD and you can take it to the distributer of your choice. However, if the veterinarian is going to send it electronically for you they will need to know who the distributer is. If you are using a paper copy to get the order filled, you can only have it filled at one feed distributer.

The next section of the VFD specifies the drug, drug level, duration of use, species and class of animal and indication of usage. This information is all specified on the drug label and any deviation from the label is consider extra label usage which is illegal for feed medications. There will also be a statement that reorders or refills are not allowed. VFDs are for one-time usage and cannot be refilled. If another treatment is necessary, your veterinarian will need to write a 2nd VFD. A common example would be pulsing CTC for 5 days for respiratory disease. Once you pulse a set of cattle for 5 days you cannot repulse without a new VFD. Your original VFD may still be valid to treat other groups of cattle but not the one that has already been treated.

One change in the VFD process that the FDA has made is that the VFD is not written for tons of feed anymore. Instead your veterinarian will write it for the approximate number of animals and the feed distributer will then determine amount of feed medication you can purchase. This is one area where your veterinarian needs information from you. The number of animals is the total number of animals that the VFD will affect. So a feedlot that is wanting to feed tylan to prevent liver abscesses would need the VFD to reflect the number of animals on feed at the time it is written PLUS the number of cattle you plan on buying over the next 6 months.

The next piece of information is the premises where the animals are located. This is not your premises ID but the physical address (911 address) where the animals are located. If you don’t have a 911 address (pasture) then your veterinarian will need the GPS coordinates. We can list multiple premises on one VFD so it is important you let your veterinarian know where all of those locations are.

The VFD also specifies what other feed medications the drug can be combined with. Your veterinarian has some flexibility to write the VFD so that only the single antibiotic can be fed or it can be written to allow feeding with other approved combinations. Make sure you tell your veterinarian what other feed medications (ionophores, anti-coccidials, MGA, or beta-agonist products) you may use so that you can get the proper feed or supplements for your operation.

Lastly, the veterinarian will specify any withdrawal time and the date that the VFD expires. Some VFD drugs have pre-determined expiration dates (45 days for Pulmotil), while most drugs that are moving to VFD status do not have expiration dates. In that case the longest your veterinarian can write the VFD for is 6 months from the date it is issued.

For livestock producers after you receive your VFD you need to keep that copy for at least 2 years and provide to the FDA if they request it. If you lose your copy you can have your veterinarian make you a new copy. Additionally, you will need to keep records of your VFD feed usage. At the minimum you should track inventory in, the date, amount and number of cattle fed the product, and any inventory left over when the VFD expires. If you make a mistake (break a bag, or feed the product to the wrong group of cattle) make sure you document it so inventory quantities match up when the FDA inspectors show up.

Remember this rule goes into effect on January 1, 2017 and you will need to have a VFD in place at that time to legally feed a VFD product. Even if you already purchased the feed you still need the VFD to feed it. Stockpiling product will not help as the FDA is already looking for people making large purchases as a way to get around the new rule. Talk with your veterinarian now to make sure you are ready on January 1.

Read the full article at http://digitalmag.iacattlemen.org/article/Vet%E2%80%99s+View/2597744/342224/article.html.

Huber Slats

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